Elephant Plains Game Lodge

Big 5 Sightings 24 to 30 March 2014

The Big 5 highlight of the week was too have Solo, the male lion, resting on our airstrip

 

Solo, the male lion - Dawie Jacobs

Solo, the male lion – Dawie Jacobs

Monday, 24 March 2014

(29 ºC)

  • Tingana, the male leopard, moving north from Wetpatch Road
  • Twelve wild dogs moving west from Wetpatch Road
  • The Styx lion pride moving south on Madash Road
  • One elephant bull feeding on Safari driveway

 

Tuesday, 25 March 2014

(32 ºC)

  • The Styx lion pride resting on Madash Road
  • Two buffalo bulls resting in EP Flood Plains
  • One buffalo bull resting at Serengeti/Manyeleti Crossing

 

Wednesday, 26 March 2014

(29 ºC)

  • The Breakaway female lion pride feeding on a juvenile zebra kill and a juvenile giraffe kill west of EP airstrip
  • Solo, the male lion, moving west from Little Gowrie driveway
  • A breeding herd of about ten elephants feeding on MMM-South
  • Two buffalo bulls resting on Zebra Drive Road

 

Giraffe - Dawie Jacobs

Giraffe and Zebra – Dawie Jacobs

Thursday, 27 March 2014

(29 ºC)

  • Solo, the male lion, resting on EP airstrip
  • A breeding herd of about thirty elephants feeding on MMM-South
  • One buffalo bull resting in the water at Serengeti Pan
  • The Styx lion pride resting north of 2nd Windmill Pan

 

Friday, 28 March 2014

(25 ºC)

  • Two buffalo bulls resting in the water at Serengeti Pan
  • Moya, the female leopard, resting on our Southern Boundary
  • Robsons, the male leopard, resting on Rhino Ring West
  • Solo, the male lion, resting at Serengeti open area

 

Saturday, 29 March 2014

(28 ºC)

  • A breeding herd of about twenty elephants feeding on EP driveway
  • Two buffalo bulls resting in the water at Serengeti Pan
  • The Styx lion pride resting on Madash Road
  • Another breeding herd of about ten elephants feeding close to Serengeti Pan

 

Side Stripe Jackal - Dawie Jacobs

Side Stripe Jackal – Dawie Jacobs

Sunday, 30 March 2014

(31 ºC)

  • Anderson, the male leopard, moving west from EP Old driveway
  • Mvula, the male leopard, moving north on MMM South
  • One buffalo bull resting on MMM North
  • The Styx lion pride resting on Simbambili firebreak

Big 5 Sightings 17 to 23 March 2014

The Big 5 highlight of the week was to see Tingana, the male leopard, drinking water in a river bed.

 

Tingana, the male leopard - Louis Liversage

Tingana, the male leopard – Louis Liversage

Monday, 17 March 2014

(33ºC, 1mm rain)

  • A breeding herd of about ten elephants feeding at Rampan open area
  • Salayexe, the female leopard, moving north from EP/Simbambili cutline

 

Tuesday, 18 March 2014

(25ºC)

  • One elephant bull feeding on EP/Shirley’s cutline
  • The Styx lion pride resting on Road 7
  • One elephant bull feeding on Rhino Ring North
  • Kurula, the female leopard, feeding on a kudu kill with her two male cubs east of Lucas open area

 

Wednesday, 19 March 2014

(33ºC)

  • A breeding herd of about twenty elephants feeding on A-main
  • The Styx lion pride feeding on an impala kill at Simbambili open area
  • Tingana, the male leopard, moving west from Simbambili Dam

 

Elephant bull - Louis Liversage

Elephant bull – Louis Liversage

Thursday, 20 March 2014

(28ºC)

  • A breeding herd of about twenty elephants feeding on Rhino Ring West
  • Salayexe, the female leopard, feeding on a bushbuck kill at Pungwe Crossing
  • Tingana, the male leopard, moving south from Land Cruiser Crossing

 

Friday, 21 March 2014

(26ºC)

  • One buffalo bull resting at Serengeti/Manyeleti Crossing
  • The Styx lion pride resting on Safari airstrip
  • A breeding herd of about ten elephants feeding on EP/Shirley’s cutline
  • Tingana, the male leopard, stalking impalas on EP open area

 

Saturday, 22 March 2014

(29ºC)

  • Tingana, the male leopard, moving north on Guarri Central
  • One buffalo bull resting in EP/Manyeleti Crossing
  • The Styx lion pride resting west of Eastern Bank Marikeng

 

The Styx lion pride - Louis Liversage

The Styx lion pride – Louis Liversage

Sunday, 23 March 2014

(33ºC)

  • One buffalo bull resting in EP/Manyeleti Crossing
  • Mvula, the male leopard, mating with Shadow, the female leopard east of Chitwa Chitwa driveway
  • Twelve wild dogs resting on Gowrie Main
  • The Styx lion pride resting north of 2nd Windmill Pan
  • Tingana, the male leopard, moving north from Zebra Drive
  • A breeding herd of about ten elephants feeding on Grasscut Road

 


Big 5 Sightings 10 to 16 March 2014

The Big 5 highlight of the week was to see the Fourway lion pride resting on Chitwa Chitwa airstrip. 

Fourway Lion pride - Devon Becker

Fourway Lion pride – Devon Becker

Monday, 10 March 2014

(26ºC)

  • One elephant bull feeding on A-main
  • The young Robson’s male leopard resting on Kuala Bear Road
  • One of Kurula’s male cubs moving south from Baboon Pan
  • One buffalo bull resting at the Rocks

 

Tuesday, 11 March 2014

(30ºC)

  • Salayexe, the female leopard, moving south on Madash Road
  • Three buffalo bulls resting on Madash Road
  • The Styx lion pride moving west from Seef’s Pan Road
  • One elephant bull moving east on Safari driveway
  • Lamula, the male leopard, moving north from Kudu Drift
  • Tingana, the male leopard, resting on EP driveway

 

Wednesday, 12 March 2014

(34ºC, 4.5mm rain)

  • One elephant bull moving east on EP/Shirley’s cutline
  • Six lions of the Styx pride resting at Simbambili open area
  • Two buffalo bulls resting at 2nd Windmill Road
  • Lamula, the male leopard, moving south from our Southern Boundary

 

Breeding herd of elephants - Devon

Breeding herd of elephants – Devon

Thursday, 13 March 2014

(24ºC, 6mm rain)

  • A breeding herd of about ten elephants feeding on Rhino Ring North
  • Another breeding herd of about five elephants feeding on Rhino Ring East
  • One buffalo bull feeding on Rhino Ring South

 

Friday, 14 March 2014

(24ºC)

  • Three wild dogs resting on Safari airstrip
  • A breeding herd of about ten elephants feeding on Marula Bult Central
  • Salayexe, the female leopard, moving south on Marula Bult Road
  • Another breeding herd of about ten elephants feeding on Safari driveway
  • One buffalo bull feeding on Kudu Drift

 

Saturday, 15 March 2014

(30ºC)

  • Tingana, the male leopard, moving west on EP driveway
  • The Styx lion pride resting on Road 7
  • One buffalo bull resting on Simbambili Firebreak
  • A breeding herd of about twenty elephants moving south from Guarri Central

 

Giraffe - Devon Becker

Giraffe – Devon Becker

Sunday, 16 March 2014

(30ºC)

  • Tingana, the male leopard, moving east on Eastern Bank Manyeleti
  • One elephant bull feeding on EP airstrip
  • One buffalo bull resting at Kimbians Crossing
  • Three wild dogs moving east on Simbambili Firebreak
  • One buffalo bull resting at Buff Pan
  • A breeding herd of about twenty elephants feeding on Simbambili Firebreak

Manager’s Report February 2013

Wild Photo of the Month. By Bror and Tuija West, Finland

Wild Photo of the Month. By Bror and Tuija West, Finland

As we ticked off the second month of the year, I can’t help asking what is going on with our weather. It has truly been quite unpredictable since January. We’ve had a lot of cloudy days with high humidity, only to see the sun come out behind the clouds for a while, before the sky closes again for a quick thunder shower. But then again, if everything in life was predictable, how boring would that be?

Female giraffe by Dawie Jacobs

Female giraffe by Dawie Jacobs

I mentioned in my previous reports that we were planning to do some work at the lodge and we started at the beginning of the month. First up was the dining room. We took out all the wooden door frames and replaced them with aluminium frames. These new doors have made quite a difference. The frames are not as wide as the original wooden ones and allow a lot more light into the room. We are very happy with the end result! We also gave one of the Luxury Suites a revamp. We closed Zebra Suite for a few days and this allowed us to also replace the frames with aluminium. While it was closed, we repainted the room and did some more work to it. It looks brand new! Over the course of the next few months, we will be renovating all the rooms and we are very excited about this venture.

Thandi, the female leopard by Louis Liversage

Thandi, the female leopard by Louis Liversage

This month we did not see much of Morné, our head ranger. You might ask why? Well, the poor man had to have a knee operation. Morné has been struggling with his knee for some time, after he injured it a few years ago while we were playing touch rugby on EP airstrip. As time passed, the problem worsened and his doctor confirmed that he needed an operation to repair some badly damaged ligaments. I am happy to report that the operation was a huge success and that he would be back at the lodge by the end of March. We wish him all the best with the recovery. Should a hippo chase us in the future, he might just be able to keep up now! In the interim we were joined by a familiar face. Stephen Pieterse, who also used to be head ranger and later manager, re-joined the team for two weeks to help out with game drives. I believe that Steve enjoyed to be back at EP and enjoyed his time here. We would like to thank him for helping out when we needed an extra ranger. I will be driving from middle March until Morné returns and am also looking forward to spending some time in the bush, sharing this beautiful area with our guests.

Salayexe, the female leopard by Dawie Jacob

Salayexe, the female leopard by Dawie Jacob

To all our guests who celebrated their birthdays this month, we hope you had a fantastic day, filled with love and laughter. May your future hold many more joyful days! At the lodge we had a couple of birthdays. On the 1st Morné celebrate his birthday. If you read our newsletter, you would know that as head ranger here at EP, Morné writes all the Rangers Reports, informing you of all the ins and outs that happened in the bush the past month. Morné has been with Elephant Plains for seven years now and we hope to still have him on staff for many more years. On the 2nd Morné’s tracker, Derrick, celebrated his birthday. As many of you, who have been on drive with these two, would know Derrick is a brilliant tracker and can follow animals deep into the bush. Next up was one of the faces that you would definitely remember if you’ve visited EP before, our barman Walter. He celebrated his birthday on the 7th, as always with the biggest smile possible on his face! Marlet celebrated her birthday on the 24th. As she spends her weeks in Nelspruit with Etienne jnr. being in school now, we did not see her, but I am sure that she had a lovely day spent with family and friends.

This month we employed another staff member. With the lodge being so busy, we thought that it would be a good idea to get an extra person to help out in a few areas, as needed. Marie van Wyk is a very hard working person that will go a long way here at lodge. She was brought up on a farm, so the bush is no strange place for her. She and her sister used to have a chicken farm that supplied some of the high market shops here in South Africa with chickens. She then went to Cape Town to try and see if she would be able to make it away from farm life, but needless to say she is back where she is happy and what better place to be, than the Sabi Sand! We also appointed a new maintenance manager, Hendrik Snyman. He started with a bang and we are very happy with what he has achieved so far. We hope that both of you would fall in love with the lodge, like all of us have and that you would enjoy working here for many years to come!

Trapcam photo of the month - Waterbuck

Trapcam photo of the month – Waterbuck

This month’s trap cam picture is two Waterbuck females, drinking water at Rampan. The name Waterbuck pretty much says it all. They like to stay around large areas of water and most times you will find them standing in the water itself, feeding on water cabbage. They are attractive antelope, with a massive white ring on their rump and a lovely, soft face. They do, however, carry a strong smell about them, as they have many glands on their legs. From being in and out of the water, they have a tendency to smell like a wet dog on a hot summer’s day! Overall, they are the (somewhat smelly) teddy bears of the bush, with their soft faces and shaggy coats.

I now hand you over to our Head Chef, Linda van Heerden, for her delicious recipe of the month. Chicken Milanese is a refreshing option for a hot summer’s afternoon lunch.

Monthly Recipe

Monthly Recipe. Chicken Milanese

Monthly Recipe. Chicken Milanese

Chicken Milanese
(Serves 4)

Ingredients

  • 4 Chicken Breasts
  • 2 Sweet Peppers
  • ½ Onion
  • 2 deseeded Tomatoes
  • 3 tbsp. Thyme
  • 2 tbsp. Oregano
  • 90ml Lemon Juice
  • 60ml Oil
  • 3 tbsp. Garlic
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Start by making the salsa. Cut the onion, sweet peppers and tomatoes into small blocks, season with coriander, salt, pepper and garlic. Mix the thyme, oregano, oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper for the marinade and place the chicken breasts into this. Arrange the chicken breasts onto a baking tray, allowing to marinade for about 2 hours. Bake for about 20mins. Once the chicken is cooked, allow to cool, slice into slices across the breast. Arrange the chicken onto plates, with some of the salsa over the top. Serve chilled with some honey and mustard dressing.

Honey mustard dressing:

  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • 2 tbsp. honey
  • 2 tbsp. mustard
  • ½ tbsp. lemon juice
  • ½ tbsp. water

Mix together well.

Serve and enjoy!

Well, that’s all from my side this month. Have a good one!

Wayne Dovey


Rangers Report February 2013

This month started on a high, with a few surprises in store for us. The day temperatures were not too bad as it was in the high twenties to low thirties, with an average maximum of 30°C. We also had a few spells of very welcomed rain, 73mm in total. We were very fortunate to have the pack of wild dogs stay in our area for a while. One day we followed the tracks of a big crocodile coming into our area, straight to one of the waterholes where we found him waiting for his first meal! It’s very nice to have gained a nice sized crocodile in one of our waterholes, but that can change at any time, as crocodiles prefer flowing to standing water.

Wild dog by Devon Becker

Wild dog by Devon Becker

Leopards

The leopard sightings were really unbelievable this month. Salayexe was a bit quiet, though. We still saw her a few times, but not as often as we normally do. We heard her a lot, as she was very vocal but then her tracks would lead us into the thickets, this tells me only one thing: she’s looking for a den site. At this stage it is very difficult to say who the father of the unborn cubs is, as she mated with a few different males. Let’s just keep our fingers crossed that Salayexe will raise this litter to adulthood. Shadow and her two cubs were also out and about and they had a big male impala kill that they enjoyed feeding on for a few days. The two little ones are not the most relaxed cubs I’ve seen, but they will get there, as all they need is time and patience from our side. With these little ones it might take a little longer that normal, as the mother leopard plays a massive roll in the habituation process of the cubs. If she is a relaxed leopard, her cubs would follow suit and vice versa. As you know, she isn’t called Shadow for nothing! Kwatile was seen a few times this month and she still has suckle marks, so her cub or cubs are still alive. One good thing is that she comes into our area more and more to hunt, which is a good sign. If she makes a kill, she might bring the cubs for us to see. Moya was also seen a few times close to our Southern boundary. It is still unclear if her cub is still alive or not. The power shifts with both the Anderson’s and Robson’s males, looking to expand more into Lamula’s area, might be the reason why she keeps them hidden. The young male, Xivambalana, still has no plans of leaving his father’s territory as he still hunts and feeds well in the area that is familiar to him. The young Robson’s male is still moving over the whole area and has no respect for any boundary as he was seen scent marking in Lamula and Tingana’s territories. By the looks of things, this young male wants to set up his area right between these two heavyweights’ territories. This young male does not lack confidence, but to be over eager can cost you your life in the bush! Let’s wait and see how this unfolds. Lamula is becoming my favourite male leopard and he is so relaxed with the vehicles. When I look back to how far he’s come and what it took to get there, you have to admire him as it was a tough stretch for him. The first time I saw him he had had a run-in with the legend, Mafufunyana. Although Mafufunyana was the dominant male, the youngster showed a lot of character and courage to stand up against this big warrior. Then it was Mvula that stood in his way and look at him now, he is a force to be reckoned with! Anderson still has his sights set on Tingana’s prime real-estate, with good hunting grounds and a few ladies. They had another stand-off, but with no fighting this time around. I think that Anderson is waiting for the right moment to strike. Tingana is still looking good and eating very well as he even killed a wildebeest female that was most probably around 240 kilograms in weight! This shows that Tingana is now in the prime of his life.

Lions

Styx lion pride by Louis Liversage

Styx lion pride by Louis Liversage

The lion sightings this month were magical! The Styx pride had a few ups and downs over these last few years and things did not go their way at all, but let’s just hope that that stays in the past. The Styx pride is yet another few babies richer, as the other adult lioness also gave birth this month. It is still unclear how many little ones she has, as we just heard the little rascals calling for mum from the safety of their den site. We will leave them at peace for the next two months, so that mother and babies can bond before we will open it up, start with the habituation process and make it an active sighting for the world to see. The female with the three older cubs is also looking good and the cubs are already active and very adventurous. When mum and her babies are found, only one vehicle may view them for a period of 10-15 minutes at a time. The four sub adult lions of the Styx pride are really looking good and still eating well. At this stage they still join up with the two adult lionesses, but leave them again when they go hunting. The two sub adult male’s future still looks rosy. With the absence of their fathers from the area, they will stay with the pride for as long as possible. Normally they would have been pushed out already, but the Majingi male lions have not been with the pride for a very long time. We also got a very nice surprise the one morning when we followed the tracks of a few lions. We eventually found them late that morning. It was what looked like three adult lioness and two sub adult cubs and these tracks belonged to the Nkuhuma pride. It was very nice to have them in our area for a while, as we do not see this pride too often. I must say, they are really looking good and very healthy. The Majingi male lions have kept a very low profile and we haven’t seen them this past month.

Tingana, the male leopard by Dawie Jacobs

Tingana, the male leopard by Dawie Jacobs

Buffalo

Although we had nice buffalo sightings this last month, there is still no sign on the big breeding herds. The breeding herds will return in a few months, when food sources get scarcer and this is normally around May. For now these bulk grazers will take their time to get here as there is a lot of water and food for them along the way. We had some great sightings with the lazy old men or “Dagga boys” as they are also called. They spend a lot of their time soaking up the sun, rolling in the mud, or resting inside the waterholes to try and get some relief from the hot days. The biggest group of males we saw was close to ten, but you normally only find between one and four males travelling together. It’s also these smaller groups that the lions would target, as there are fewer horns to watch out for.

Elephant

Summer sunset in the lowveld by Dawie Jacobs

Summer sunset in the lowveld by Dawie Jacobs

There was no shortage of elephant sightings during February! As we are slowly reaching the end of the marula fruiting season, it forces the elephants to move around a lot more, in search of the last fruits. Another tree that had fruit which the elephants love was the Milkberry tree, but that also came to an end. There are no more big herds as they have split up into smaller units, because there is enough food and water for them almost everywhere. We also saw a few newborn babies this month, trying to keep up with the herd or trying to work out how their trunks work. We also had a few really big male elephants working their way through the area, following the herds or even joining up with some of the herds. One big male in musth can push over about ten trees per day, not necessarily to eat it, but just to impress the ladies and show off his strength. The females on the other hand, will always go for the biggest or strongest males, as they would have stronger genes. Survival of the fittest and nature’s way of making sure the best genes possible go forward. How amazing is this world we live in?

Special sighting

The special sighting this month was Tingana with his adult female wildebeest kill. It is not uncommon for a big male leopard to go after bigger pray like kudu females, waterbuck females or wildebeest females. What made this sighting very special was that the next morning after he made the kill, four hyenas pulled in and had a feast. The hyenas were really gorging themselves on this wildebeest kill and all that poor Tingana could do was to keep an eye on them from a safe distance. Suddenly out of nowhere, five adult wild dogs came running towards the hyenas. The standoff between the wild dogs and the hyenas only took five minutes, as the hyenas ran for the hills as fast as they could. After the wild dogs had their fill, they moved away to go and fetch the pups. Tingana had his kill back. It does not happen often that you see three different predators eating from one kill.

Did you know?

A Wildebeest or Gnu falls into the antelope family, same as the impala.

I hope you enjoyed this month’s report. See you out on game drive soon!

Morné Fouché


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